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Caught on camera: Boulder police help unite 78-year-old dementia patient with her family

“Boulder police are being credited with safely reuniting a 78-year-old dementia patient with her family…”

 

Tarrant Will Open Diversion Center to Avoid Jailing Those with Mental Health Needs

“Tarrant County will soon have a mental health diversion center to avoid incarcerating people with mental health needs.

 

Long Beach Prosecutor Expands Diversion Program to Get Homeless Help

“A diversion program sending homeless people charged with or convicted of misdemeanor crimes to places where they can get help instead of going to jail is expanding in Long Beach.”

 

Activists Seek to Change the Relationship Between Mental Health and Policing

“The thing is, most people have been trained to call 911 in distress,” said Vincent Atchity, the executive director of Mental Health Colorado. Mental Health Colorado runs the Equitas Project, which advocates for mental health and criminal justice reform. “There are entities that do mobile outreach, but you need to find your way to them.”


New York City to try responding to mental health calls without police

Mental health and crisis workers in New York City will respond to emergency mental health calls instead of law enforcement under a pilot program announced on Tuesday, following months of protests around the country over police brutality.


Here’s How a 911 Call Without Police Could Work

While CAHOOTS is a promising alternative to using police forces as a solution to all a city’s problems, they do currently work in tandem with local police. Workers on shift may be dispatched along with police officers or may decide to call them in if they feel someone is unable to make themselves or others safe. But last year, of the 24,000 calls handled by the program, only 150 required police assistance. In both scenarios, CAHOOTS workers stick around to mediate, advocating for the subject of the call. “We use our de-escalation techniques to make the scenario have a more calm and therapeutic outcome than it otherwise may,” Morgan explained.


Mental Illness as a Crime

On March 23, just a day after having gone to the hospital for mental health problems, a 41-year-old man named Daniel Prude bolted out of his brother Joe’s home in Rochester, N.Y, wearing few clothes. Joe was scared about what might happen to his brother.

So he did what many Americans do when facing an emergency involving mental illness. He called 911.

“Americans with mental illnesses make up nearly a quarter of those killed by police officers.”


‘He’s a small child’: Utah police shot a 13-year-old autistic boy after his mother called 911 for help

When Golda Barton dialed 911 on Friday, she hoped emergency responders could help hospitalize her 13-year-old son, who has Asperger syndrome and was having a mental crisis.

Instead, a Salt Lake City police officer repeatedly shot Linden Cameron after he ran away, leaving the boy in serious condition…


New York City to try responding to mental health calls without police

Mental health and crisis workers in New York City will respond to emergency mental health calls instead of law enforcement under a pilot program announced on Tuesday, following months of protests around the country over police brutality.

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